Van Morrison - DOMINO

First performance: 13/04/2002


Coverinfo

Bruce played the song 3 times;
 
During the Rumson Country Day School Benefits
 
2002-04-13 - THE STONE PONY, ASBURY PARK
Private benefit for the Rumson Country Day School. Guests, besides friends and family, were parents and school supporters, who contributed $1,000 per couple to the school for admission, and teachers from the school, who were reportedly invited for free. Springsteen announced his contribution a couple of months previous at a private fundraising event for the school. Bruce is accompanied by Patti Scialfa, Soozie Tyrell, Lisa Lowell, Southside Johnny and Bobby Bandiera with his band (including Bob Burger, Steve 'Muddy' Shews, Joey Stann, Mike Mancini, and Joe Bellia). 
 
2002-04-14 - THE STONE PONY, ASBURY PARK
Rumson Country Day School Benefit
 
2003-04-30 - THE STONE PONY, ASBURY PARK
Rumson Country Day School Benefit
 
 

Songinfo

"Domino" is a hit song written by Northern Irish singer-songwriter Van Morrison. It is the opening track of his fourth studio album, His Band and the Street Choir. This song is Morrison's personal musical tribute to New Orleans R&B singer and pianist Fats Domino. It was released by Warner Bros. Records in October 1970 as the first of three singles from the album.
 
 
 

Other cover versions

Bruce on the artist

Bruce Springsteen’s 25 Biggest Heroes:

Springsteen was a huge fan of Van Morrison's old garage band Them (best known for "Gloria") in the 1960s, but it wasn't until he saw Morrison in concert sometime around 1971 that he truly understood the man's genius. He found the combination of organ and horns intoxicating, and the influence on his first two albums is unmistakable. If you don't believe that, listen to Morrison's "Domino" and Springsteen's "Rosalita (Come Out Tonight)" back to back. Van's 1968 masterpiece Astral Weeks became a particular obsession. "It was like a religion to us," Steve Van Zandt said in 2005. They even brought Morrison's bass player Richard Davis into the studio to play on Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J., and Born to Run.

desert island songs :

Van Morrison - Madame George (1968): The previous tracks helped to lay down the foundations of the figure who would become Bruce Springsteen - the rocker. But once he’d started on his artistic journey, other influences began to emerge:

"Astral Weeks was an extremely important record for me. It made me trust in beauty, it gave me a sense of the divine. The divine just seems to run through the veins of that entire album. Of course there was incredible singing and the playing of Richard Davis on the bass. It was trance music. It was repetitive. It was the same chord progression over and over again. But it showed how expansive something with very basic underpinning could be. There’d be no New York City Serenade if there hadn’t been Astral Weeks."
 

Lyrics

Don't want to discuss it
I think it's time for a change
You may get disgusted
Start thinkin' that I'm strange
In that case I'll go underground
Get some heavy rest
Never have to worry
About what is worst and what is best (get it)
Oh oh Domino (all right)
Roll me over Romeo
There you go
Lord have mercy
I said oh oh Domino
Roll me over Romeo
There you go
Say it again
I said oh oh Domino
I said oh oh Domino, dig it
There's no need for argument
There's no argument at all
And if you never hear from him
That just means he didn't call or vice versa
That depends on wherever you're at
Or and if you never hear from me
That just means I would rather not
Oh oh Domino
Roll me over Romeo
There you go
Lord have mercy
I said oh oh Domino
Roll me over Romeo
There you go
Say it again
Oh oh Domino
I said oh oh Domino.
Hey Mr. DJ
I just want to hear some rhythm and blues music
On the radio
On the radio
On the radio
Uh-uh, all right
Uh-uh, all right
Uh-uh, all right
Uh-uh
Hear the band
One more time