who ( The ) - My Generation

First performance: 30/09/1967


Coverinfo

Bruce performed the song 6 times:
 
1966-11-00 - CAFÉ WHA?, NEW YORK CITY
The Castiles audition at Café Wha?, which they pass. This sets in motion what would turn out to be an extensive series of about thirty shows at Café Wha? over the next fifteen months. Tex Vinyard mentioned in an interview that "My Generation" was the song that got the band the gig. The club, located at 115 MacDougal Street in the west village of New York City, opened in 1959. Under the guidance of owner/manager Manny Roth, it became a prominent, cutting edge musical venue during the 1960s. A plethora of famous musicians played there (many of them unknowns who were just getting started). The now legendary club still operates to this day in the same location as it did all those years ago. Bob Dylan’s first ever stage performance (a walk-on) in New York took place at the Café Wha in January 1961. See the News tab for an extensive overview of The Castiles’ history at this club.
 
Bruce covered the song in september 1967 with the Castiles at the band’s second gig in the 'left foot' in Freehold. Only 26 minutes of the band’s 60-minute performance exists on the original master tape. The tape included 'one by one'. Keep in mind that only a small amount of setlists of the early years has surfaced, so it may have been played a lot more. One show, double bill, with The Castiles headlining. This was the band’s second gig at the club (see September 16). The 13-song mentioned setlist represents The Castiles’ complete performance at this show, in the correct song sequence. This was The Castiles’ final appearance at The Left Foot. Although having only opened in September 1967, The Left Foot’s popularity dropped dramatically in March 1968 when the larger, trendier Freehold Hullabaloo club opened nearby. The Left Foot closed for good in April 1968.
 
 
 
 
1976-11-26 - BOTTOM LINE, NEW YORK CITY
early show with Patti Smith
 
 
1976-11-26 - BOTTOM LINE, NEW YORK CITY
late show with Patti Smith
 
Bruce had a guest appearance during a show with Patti Smith. Bruce plays piano or guitar on all the tracks of the setlist mentionned under, a mixture of spoken word, poems and songs. At the early show, "Slowly Walking Down The River" and "My Car Was Invisible (Case Of Bruce Springsteen)" are improvised, semi-spoken-word pieces performed by Smith with Bruce on piano. "Picture Hanging Blues" features Bruce on piano and Lenny Kaye on guitar. The full Patti Smith Group joins starting on The Velvet Underground's "We're Gonna Have A Real Good Time Together", which features Bruce on piano. He returned later in the show to play guitar on several more songs, believed to have been those listed underneath. A fan present at the late show recalls "Bruce mostly played guitar since John Cale was on piano for most songs. A few of my photos do show Bruce at the piano however." 
 
 
 
 
First-ever E Street performance of "My Generation" makes its only tour appearance. "My Generation" is played by sign request. 
 
Bruce makes a guest appearance at the 11th Annual Map Fund Concert honoring The Who's Pete Townshend and its manager, Bill Curbishley, hosted by the MusiCares Foundation. Springsteen presents Townshend with the Stevie Ray Vaughan Award for his work supporting the MusiCares MAP Fund, giving a moving and entertaining speech about Townshend, seeing The Who in Asbury Park in 1967, and his subsequent attempt at copying The Who's stage dramatics with The Castiles. Springsteen joins Townshend and Roger Daltrey with their touring band for "My Generation", and again for the finale "Won't Get Fooled Again" with all the evening's performers on stage, including Joan Jett, Willie Nile and Billy Idol. 
 

Songinfo

"My Generation" is a song by the English rock band the Who, which became a hit and one of their most recognizable songs. The song was released as a single on 29 October 1965. "My Generation" also appeared on The Who's 1965 debut album. Townshend reportedly wrote the song on a train and is said to have been inspired by the Queen Mother, who is alleged to have had Townshend's 1935 Packard hearse towed off a street in Belgravia because she was offended by the sight of it during her daily drive through the neighbourhood. Townshend has also credited Mose Allison's "Young Man Blues" as the inspiration for the song, saying "Without Mose I wouldn't have written 'My Generation'."
 
 
 

Other cover versions

Bruce on the artist

 
Springsteen presents Townshend with the Stevie Ray Vaughan Award for his work supporting the MusiCares MAP Fund, giving a moving and entertaining speech about Townshend, seeing The Who in Asbury Park in 1967, and his subsequent attempt at copying The Who's stage dramatics with The Castiles

"Thank you. Pete’s receiving the Stevie Ray Vaughan Award this year for his dedication to helping others who struggle with drug and alcohol addiction, for his work with the Who and his Double ‘O’ charity, Pete’s got a long history of working hard and raising spirits and money for worthy causes. Here’s just a few: In 1986, Double ‘O’ promotions put on a Colombian Volcano relief concert. In 1989, the Who reconvened for an anniversary tour, generated over $8 million for children’s charities throughout the U.K. and the U.S.A. In the past years, the Who have helped the Teenage Cancer Trust raise close to 3 million pounds to provide cancer wards and screening units. There are plans on this tour to raise funds for charities as various as the Teenage Cancer Trust, the Michael J. Fox Foundation, the Andre Agassi Charitable Foundation for Underprivileged Children, the Robin Hood Foundation which funds and supports innovative poverty-fighting organizations in New York City. I could go on and tell you much more about what Pete and the Who have done for others, but I think I’ll tell you a little bit about what Pete’s done for me. I wouldn’t be windmilling a Fender Telecaster if it weren’t for Pete Townshend. It’s the summer of ’66 or ’67, I’m not sure which one, but it was the first American tour that the Who were on. And I’m in a long line snaking out of Convention Hall down the boardwalk and the billboard read, in big type, Herman’s Hermits [laughter], then The Who [laughter]. I was a young, pimply-faced teenager who managed to scrap enough together to go see my first rock concert ever. Pete and the Who were young pimply-faced teenagers with a record contract, a tour and a rude, aggressive magic. They were on this tour, of all things, opening for Herman’s Hermits [laughter]. There was no justice. So, I scrambled to my seat, which seemed like the cavernous Convention Hall and I waited for the rumble to start. The first band out, I think was a band called the Blues Magoos. They were at a New York City, uh, yeah,… There are a few folks who remember the Blues Magoos out there? [cheers] I don’t believe you [laughter]. But they had a great song, “We Ain’t Got Nothing Yet,” and they came out and they had these electric suits and when all the lights went out in the hall, the electric suits lit up and, it was high-level special effects for the time. But then the Who came out. I think they played for probably no more than 30 minutes, and before Pete and a cloud of smoke demolished his guitar, bashing it over and over into the floor. And his amplifier… Now the audience was filled with a significant number of teenyboppers who were waiting for “Mrs. Brown, You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter.” So they sat there with their mouths agape, and they were wondering, like, of course, who are you? Who are these guys? What are they doing? Why are they doing it? And all I knew was, for some reason, this music and the demolishing of these perfectly fine instruments filled me with incredible joy. There was something wonderful about the wanton destruction of good commercial property [laughter]. It was the joy and giddiness of the riot that the Who managed somehow to safely attain; semi-safely attain. But all I knew is that it made me happy and it thrilled and inspired me. Inspired me to a degree where I was in a young band called the Castiles. I was about 16 years old. We had a gig the next weekend at Saint Rose of Lima Catholic School in the basement for the CYO dance [laughter]. So I went out and I bought a smoke bomb and I bought a strobe light and I brought them over to the gig. And as the night neared its end — not being able to smash my guitar — It was the only one I had, you know. At the end of the night, I lit the smoke bomb in the Catholic school basement. I turned on the strobe light and I climbed on top of my Danelectro amplifier holding a vase of flowers that I had stolen from one of the upstairs classrooms [laughter]. And with this huge flourish, melodramatically, I raised the vase of flowers as the flickering, blinding strobe lit me with the smoke all around me, and as the nuns looked on in horror, I reached up and smashed them onto the dance floor [laughter]. And then I jumped off the amp and I stomped all over the petunias, putting them into an early death. Of course, I looked ridiculous and like I lost my mind. The vase of flowers simply failed to have the grandeur of the newly minted Telecaster being smashed to splinters. But, we worked with what we had so… I went home smiling, feeling like a blood bond with Pete Townshend, and I never looked back. As I grew older, the Who’s music seemed to grow with me. The sexual frustration, the politics, identity. These things coursed through my veins with every concurring Who album. I always found myself there somewhere in their music. “The Seeker”; the seeker is the guy in “Born to Run.” There’d be no “Down in jungle,” ba da ba, “land,” without Pete’s slashing bloody attack on his instrument. Pete is the greatest rhythm guitarist of all time [cheers]. He plays such incredible rhythm and he showed you don’t have to play any lead. It’s an amazing thing to behold, really. Pete managed to take the dirty business of rock & roll and somehow make it spiritual and turn it into a quest. He may hate this, but he identified the place where it was noble and he wasn’t afraid to go there. I took a lot of that with me as the years passed by. So Pete, I’m here to say, congratulations, well deserved, and thanks for not just Who’s Next, and for Who Are You, but for who I am [applause]. Congratulations Pete.

Compiled by : Rolling Stone
 

Lyrics

People try to put us d-down
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
Just because we get around
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
Things they do look awful c-c-cold
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
I hope I die before I get old
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
My generation
This is my generation, baby
Why don't you all f-fade away
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
Don't try to dig what we all s-s-say
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
I'm not trying to cause a big s-s-sensation
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
I'm just talkin' 'bout my g-g-generation
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
My generation
This is my generation, baby
Why don't you all f-fade away
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
And don't try to d-dig what we all s-s-say
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
I'm not trying to cause a b-big s-s-sensation
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
I'm just talkin' 'bout my g-g-generation
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
My generation
This is my generation, baby
My, my, my, my generation
My, my, my, my generation
People try to put us d-down
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
Just because we g-g-get around
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
Things they do look awful c-c-cold
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
Yeah, I hope I die before I get old
(Talkin' 'bout my generation)
My generation
This is my generation, baby
My, my, my, my generation
My, my, my, my generation
Talkin' 'bout my generation
(My generation)
Talkin' 'bout my generation
(My generation)
Talkin' 'bout my generation
(Is my generation baby)
Talkin' 'bout my generation
(This is my generation)
Talkin' 'bout my generation
(This is my generation)
Talkin' 'bout my generation
(This is my generation)
Talkin' 'bout my generation
(This is my generation)
Talkin' 'bout my generation
(This is my generation)